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Nudging towards sustainable palm oil

15 Jul

Nutella has it, so do many, many biscuits, snacks, breads, cakes, confectionery fillings, ice cream, processed cheeses, and more. And that’s just the food applications of palm oil. It’s also a typical ingredient in the production of soaps, detergents, pharmaceutical products, cosmetics and more. The Big Ecological Issue is the grand scale of the plantations necessary to produce all this palm oil for global consumption and the concomitant destruction of wild habitats. You can read up more in dossiers and campaigns run by the major NGOs such as WWF, Greenpeace, Rainforest Action Network and also the Orangutan Project and on the Say No To Palm Oil site.

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Publicity and pressure around this issue have given rise to a roundtable on more responsible palm oil production, the RSPO, though the issue stays highly controversial. There is now a small supply of alternatively produced palm oil, which is used, for example, by the manufacturer of the soap we are presenting in today’s entry: Sustain. Whereas yesterday’s soap showed you melting glaciers and icebergs, today’s soap shows and tells you about the critically endangered animals you help save by using it – clean hands + cleaner conscience?sustain-06_klein05_01_11_sustain6_klein

Sustain is a soap made with 100% sustainable palm oil. Simon and the Treasure Studio in Harrogate, UK, developed three characters based on redlisted animals (Bornean orangutan, Malayan Tiger, Papuan Monitor Lizard). Copywriter Chris Miller created some lovely copy that gave each animal real personality and also highlighted their plight. More beautiful soaps in more beautiful packaging here.

Embracing imperfections

13 May

506a2a76fb04d60a47000e15__w_530_h_530_s_fit_kleinWhat we did to pottery and ceramic ware yesterday, we can do to walls, rooms and houses today: enhance cracks, cuts, bruises and breaks by purposefully incorporating them . Olivo Barbieri’s image entitled Napoli shows this beautifully. Ironically enough Olivo’s print is worth a fair bit … as you can see on p. 216 in the issuu-based auction catalogue Italia.  Image found on FFFFOUND!; followed to ApartmentTherapy and beyond to David John’s site YouHaveBeenHereSomeTime.

Repair it, fixit, kintsugit

9 May

Kintsugi – a traditional Japanese technique for our modern times: Sustainable Habits include repairing things and fixing stuff – remember the Repair Manifesto here? Kintsugi takes it a level higher: You don’t just keep something [broken]. You don’t just fix it as best you can [and feel its lost its worth]. You keep it, fix it and make the fix so special you add to the value.

Kintsugi_kleinKintsugi – means to repair broken ceramic ware using gold joinery. Kintsugi involves attaching the broken pieces using lacquer (urushi) and applying gold powder to the join. DIY variants mix gold powder with adhesives. Also, there are similar techniques using silver or copper. Step-by-step pics shown here and on an antique bonsai pot here.

kintsugi-treasure-vessels--UDU2Ny0xMDg1MjUuNDgxMTIz_kleinkintsugi_2_klein???????????????????????????????Kitsugi restores functionality to something broken, though others contend that that is not its purpose. Kintsugi transforms by purposefully including damage and keeping it visible, indeed, highlighting it, imbuing an item with new characteristics. Kintsugi adds beauty and worth,  it turns scars, destruction and damage into the most valuable part of the piece and immortalizes in gold, silver, bronze or copper. Kintsugi: art, aesthetics and appreciation.

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Sarkis Zabunyan, a Turkish-born, Paris-based Armenian artist, was commissioned by  Bernardaud, a Limousine porcelain brand (no, make that a French national icon) in lieu of the 150 year company celebrations in 2013. Sarkis, inspired by kitsugi, designed a 12-piece dinner plate set of individually crafted plates.

Do some reading on The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics here, recommended by Kenetha J. Stanton in her blog entry ‘About Kitsugi’ here. Vimeo clip on Ifixit here (you can take a Repair It Pledge on Ifixit here). First seen [Kitsugi] on ThisIsColossal here.

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There are too many greenhouse gases

1 Apr

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Towards happier hens

21 Mar

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A somewhat older (2004) but currently timeless ad on hen’s eggs. Run by the Swedish supermarket chain Coop Konsum, for its organic product line. Ad credits see here. Thoughts on happy cows see here.

And you thought cutlery was for getting food from your plate to your mouth

12 Mar

Along comes Seoul-born Jinhyun Jeon, a Master of Arts graduate (Social Design) from Design Academy Eindhoven (remember fellow grad Jihyun Rou we mentioned here) and gives that idea a thorough shake-rattle-and-roll. Jinhyun’s MA thesis on Synthetic Sensorial Stimuli uses Synaesthesia as a source of design insight and then applies this to eating implements. Result: Sensorially stimulating tableware designed to make eating an experience rich beyond food.

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The thesis is listed in the Graduate Show 2012 Project Directory here and here. Jinhyun started exploring how people visualize taste here,

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then conceived the idea of cutlery as a sensorial appetizer here,

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before designing a full tableware set using metal, plastics and ceramics here, which she sees leading to mindful eating and rediscovering a healthy and joyful relationship with food. Jinhyun worked with the 5 senses (hear, touch, see, taste, smell), 4 tastes (sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and 5 elements (temperature, colour, texture, volume/weight, form). (via dezeen)

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Cutlery for the hungry

11 Mar

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Designed by Brooklyn-based artist Mark Reigelmann (nice team photo). Goes by the name of Bite (see Portfolio/Objects/3, 4 & 5). Designed to highlight starvation and obesity.